The Crazy Collective

It's Edible Pop Culture, Goddammit.

(Source: hurwitzs, via oijio)

oupacademic:


What do you call your loved one? Perhaps you call them honey or darling, or if you’re a little more old-fashioned, you might call them flitter-mouse or honey-sop. Not following?

6 July, is International Kissing Day, and we’ve found a few unusual archaic terms of endearment in the Oxford English Dictionary that you might want to try out for the occasion.
Image: Romeo and Juliet by Frank Dicksee. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

oupacademic:

What do you call your loved one? Perhaps you call them honey or darling, or if you’re a little more old-fashioned, you might call them flitter-mouse or honey-sop. Not following?

6 July, is International Kissing Day, and we’ve found a few unusual archaic terms of endearment in the Oxford English Dictionary that you might want to try out for the occasion.

Image: Romeo and Juliet by Frank Dicksee. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

(via themonicabird)

asylum-art:

Creative Sculptures by Hedi Xandt

Hedi Xandt imagines impressive sculptures. Mixing styles and materials with talent, the artist invites us to discover his dark and intense universe.

(via pink-absinthe)

likeafieldmouse:

Inigo Aragon - Contemporary Altars (2012)

(via sumbungero)

jaredchapman:

Yearbook photos

stereogum:

Sam Smith and Florence Welch at Glastonbury.

stereogum:

Sam Smith and Florence Welch at Glastonbury.

reubydoomsday:

Nobody’s immune to breast cancer.

(Source: -ryan, via sister-queen)

mollyyoung:

Really enjoy when the Times editorializes here.

mollyyoung:

Really enjoy when the Times editorializes here.

kateoplis:

"Myhrvold’s recipes can be so scientific that they seem self-defeating, like a sex guide on how to achieve the perfect orgasm that instructs its reader to stop every 45 seconds during intercourse to check his pulse and pupil dilation."

After 45 courses, I was lowing like a cow. In my food- and wine-altered state, I began to meditate on the notion of death by senseless beauty. By the fifth hour, Adrià was openly taunting me. He called out for second helpings while I groaned. “The kind of people who mock long tasting menus,” Adrià said, “are the same people you see lining up at the hotel breakfast buffet, dumping 30 different things on their plates.” Adrià’s future plan is to begin cooking only about 20 nights a year. “Cooking at this level is like giving a concert,” he said. “No one in their right mind gives 300 concerts a year.” The one piece of advice he has given Myhrvold: “Never open a restaurant.”

The final dish, an absinthe cocktail topped with a swirling sugar mold made with a 3D printer, arrived after 6 p.m.”

"And yet well after midnight, I ducked out of my hotel room for a greasy cheeseburger at Dick’s.”

The End of Cuisine